Feb. 9 sermon of the Rev. Robert F. Tucker, St. Louis de Montfort Parish, Litchfield

Pass the Salt!

St. Matthew in his Gospel for this weekend states, “You are the salt of the earth and the light of the world.”  In the response we stated, “The just man is a light in darkness to the upright.”

During these days in the middle of the winter, we realize that the nights are long, and we would like the light of the sun to shine stronger and longer.  So, it is the same with so much food that we eat, we like a little salt to flavor it.  Salt purifies, seasons, and preserves but as we know we cannot use it in great quantity!  As a light in the darkness we must purify, season and preserve each other with a little light of kindness, love, patience, forgiveness and peace each day.  We might ask each other to please pass these lights and salts down the table to us! Your words and actions are to be the salt and light of the Lord that you pass out each day.

It is easy to talk about these Christians gifts but to act on them is another story.  Think this week about the man who got up to leave in the middle of the priest’s talk and came back near the end of Mass.  At the door, the priest asked him, “If he was feeling okay?”  He responded, “Sure I’m okay, I just left to get a haircut.”  The priest asked him.” Why didn’t you get one before Mass?” The man responded, “I did not need it then.” So, it is not the words that we hear that grow in our minds and hearts, but they grow hair unless we put them into action.

Before creating any living thing, God created light to shine forth over all of the world.  Much is hidden in the shadows, either intentionally or unintentionally.  We are called by baptism intentionally to be a light and salt of and for Christ!  We are called to carry, act and shine out for others in the darkness and shadows of life.  It is not so much exposing the evils of life and suffering, but offering the salt of love and life.

We celebrate Lincoln’s Birthday on Wednesday. Reflect on some of those salty and light filled words of the Gettysburg Address; pass the light and salt of them on this week.  As we celebrate Valentine’s Day on Friday, think of the story of the young man who went looking for a beautiful Valentine Card.  He asked the clerk for the card that expresses one’s deepest feelings.  She immediately went and pulled out a card that stated, “To my true love, the light of my life, the flavor of my heart, the very essence of beauty and grace.  I love you more than words can say.”  The man stated, “That’s perfect, it’s exactly what I’m looking for, Ill take five of them.”